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Biggest One Season Wonders


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since this thread got merged, biggest 1 year wonder I remember was John Tudor in '85 with the Cards. A back of the rotation type before that, injury prone (and a sour attitude) afterwards, but for one season he was almost unhittable: 21-8, 1.93 ERA, .938 WHIP, 14 complete games, 10 shutouts

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Obviously everyone who will be mentioned in this thread will be linked to steroids, but lets see how many guys we can name that had Monster years DURING their career and never came close to those numb

Mark Fidrych Mike Caruso Angel Berroa Walt Dropo Tom Herr Shingo Takatsu Rick Wilkins

I don't think Rodney 2012 counts as a one hit wonder. An anamoly perhaps, but the guy still saved 37 games last season making him still quite relevant

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Ollie Perez ridiculous breakout year with Pitt a few seasons back has to come to mind. He looked well on his way to ace status and just never figured it out after that one remarkable yr

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Phil Plantier with the Pads in the early 1990's went 30-100, never did much again or before that.

Mark Davis won the Cy Young as a Closer with the Pads, then I think signed a big FA deal with the Royals and was horrific, was never a closer again.

Pat Listach - Rookie of the Year, stole 50+ bases for the Brewers, was never really fantasy relevant again.

Shawn Estes - 19-5 with Giants with a 3.18 ERA and 180K, never had sub 4.00ERA again.

Mike Scott, Mid 1980's CY Young winner with the Astros, was a journeyman type, career high in K's to that point in a season was sub 150, he put up over 300K in 1986.

How about recent, Fernando Rodney 2012, that was an all-timer from a generally thought of all-time bumb.

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I find it amazing how few batters even the best pitchers were striking out in the mid-late 70s and early-mid 80s.

Stone '80 is a great example. He threw 250 innings, waked over 100 and only struck out 150! And he won 25 games with a 2.50 ERA!

I agree, look at the guys you think were "dominant" types, even closers, I was looking at Rich Gossage's numbers not too long ago thinking he must have been off the charts when a thread about Kimbrel was going on, I think he had one season with a K per 9 in double digits and it was like 10.something.
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Esteban Loaiza always gives me a good laugh. This guy was scrub city forever, then randomly in his age 31 season he posts a 2.90 ERA, 1.11 WHIP, strikes out 207 (137 was previous high) and wins 21 games. Then after that he proceeds to suck the rest of his career. Well he did have a decent year with the Nationals a few years later but 1.30 WHIP and more hits than IP aren't great seasons in my book despite a respectable 3.77 ERA.

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Indeed.

Ron Guidy's dominant '78 featured a k/9 of 8.16! (He never reached 8.0 in ANY other full season!)

Tom Seaver exceeded a k/9 of 9.0 only once! (Meanwhile, he regularly threw more than 250 innings in 11 of his first 12 season! (yet no TJ surgery or injuries)

Guidry had three 20-win seasons and three more with at least 26. He wasn't a fluke.

Also, there shouldn't be any mention of guys who had there huge aberrational years in '87 (rabbit ball) or '96 (explosion of roid era). Otherwise, we'll be including Terry Steinbach and Todd Hundley and countless others.

For true One Year Wonders, look at the likes of Joe Charbonneau or Jeremy Hermida or Jerome Walton.

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Norm Cash and his corked bat in 1961.

Luis Gonzalez and his roids in 2001.

Wade Boggs hit 24 HRs in 1987. The most he ever hit in a season after that was 11.

Jacoby Ellsbury in 2011.

This is why I said to throw out 1987. We now have a Hall of Famer who's a One Year Wonder.

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Norm Cash and his corked bat in 1961.

Luis Gonzalez and his roids in 2001.

Wade Boggs hit 24 HRs in 1987. The most he ever hit in a season after that was 11.

Jacoby Ellsbury in 2011.

This is why I said to throw out 1987. We now have a Hall of Famer who's a One Year Wonder.

Boggs was a great hitter. I never said he was a one-year wonder. Only that he never had a season close to that HR total. Thanks for putting words in my mouth, though.

Here another one: Hideo Nomo's rookie year in 1995.

Edited by Posting In The Clutch
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Norm Cash and his corked bat in 1961.

Luis Gonzalez and his roids in 2001.

Wade Boggs hit 24 HRs in 1987. The most he ever hit in a season after that was 11.

Jacoby Ellsbury in 2011.

This is why I said to throw out 1987. We now have a Hall of Famer who's a One Year Wonder.

Boggs was a great hitter. I never said he was a one-year wonder. Only that he never had a season close to that HR total. Thanks for putting words in my mouth, though.

Isn't the thread supposed to be a discussion on one year wonders?

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Norm Cash and his corked bat in 1961.

Luis Gonzalez and his roids in 2001.

Wade Boggs hit 24 HRs in 1987. The most he ever hit in a season after that was 11.

Jacoby Ellsbury in 2011.

This is why I said to throw out 1987. We now have a Hall of Famer who's a One Year Wonder.

Boggs was a great hitter. I never said he was a one-year wonder. Only that he never had a season close to that HR total. Thanks for putting words in my mouth, though.

Isn't the thread supposed to be a discussion on one year wonders?

I suppose, but I interpreted it as career-years for players. You don't have to follow threads to a tee.

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Norm Cash and his corked bat in 1961.

Luis Gonzalez and his roids in 2001.

Wade Boggs hit 24 HRs in 1987. The most he ever hit in a season after that was 11.

Jacoby Ellsbury in 2011.

This is why I said to throw out 1987. We now have a Hall of Famer who's a One Year Wonder.

Boggs was a great hitter. I never said he was a one-year wonder. Only that he never had a season close to that HR total. Thanks for putting words in my mouth, though.

Isn't the thread supposed to be a discussion on one year wonders?

I suppose, but I interpreted it as career-years for players. You don't have to follow threads to a tee.

Then we'll be going with this for a really, really, really long time because we'll be including most players who ever took the field.

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I'll throw out some obscure names, all from the roid era, who had one or two good years and see if you can remember these guys.

Jeffrey Hammonds (Coors factor)

Mark Quinn (He started out like crazy, awful plate discipline did him in.)

John Jaha (Big-time roider)

Paul Abbott (Went 17-4 with putrid peripheral stats in 2001. Oh, the good ol' days when pitching Ws were viewed as relevant.)

Kent Bottenfield (Went 18-7 with a WHIP over 1.50 in '99. He actually made the All-Star Game.)

Edited by The Harsh
Stop bypassing the profanity filter.
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I find it amazing how few batters even the best pitchers were striking out in the mid-late 70s and early-mid 80s.

Stone '80 is a great example. He threw 250 innings, waked over 100 and only struck out 150! And he won 25 games with a 2.50 ERA!

A lot of this had to do with many pitchers relying more on their fastballs. I was only born in '86, but I've watched a lot of old games from the 70s and 80s. Pitchers would just pump sinkers and try to pile up GBs to work deep into games. There were very few guys who had a wide variety of secondary pitches. Guys like Koufax and Nolan Ryan had absolute secondary filth and racked up Ks. But the use of changeups, splits, cutters, etc was far less. A lot of top of the rotation pitchers mainly were fastball-breaking ball, so they were more predictable. Now, most top of the rotation guys have four pitches.

Also, hitters were more aggressive, a lot of players had more punch and judy approaches. Now, even most middle infielders have a lot of swing and miss in their game and sell out for power. Working the count was less emphasized back in the day, as was taking BBs. Back in the 70s and 80s, you would see middle of the lineup hitters trying to slap the ball to the opposite field. Now, it's rare to see a player with an approach like that. Reggie Jackson was one of the first of the modern breed of hitter. Drop your shoulder, sell out for power, and don't worry about Ks. Not many hitters had that approach 30-40 years ago.

Edited by mjk356
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I'll throw out some obscure names, all from the roid era, who had one or two good years and see if you can remember these guys.

Jeffrey Hammonds (Coors factor)

Mark Quinn (He started out like crazy, awful plate discipline did him in.)

John Jaha (Big-time roider)

Paul Abbott (Went 17-4 with putrid peripheral stats in 2001. Oh, the good ol' days when pitching Ws were viewed as relevant.)

Kent Bottenfield (Went 18-7 with a WHIP over 1.50 in '99. He actually made the All-Star Game.)

Jaha had three good seasons. Hit .313-20-65 in 88 games in '95, a pace that would have put him over 30-100 comfortably. Had 34-118 and 35-111 seasons. He had good starts to a couple of other seasons that were derailed.

I think Richard Hidalgo is the definition of a one-year wonder, LOL.

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