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Just now, 89Topps said:

 

Chewing gum and sunflower seeds are going to be the deal breaker in this plan.

As a fellow human, i can acknowledge breaking habits are hard. However, i would also like to think that if they are educated prior to as why they may not be able to do that, or if they do, they must discard it properly that they would be capable of doing it while looking out for their teammates and their contracts to be honest. But, i have been let down by humanity plenty of times so breaking a habit that occurs so frequently and without much thought might be hard to accomplish.

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Crazy with no sports. Talked to my wife last night.  Apparently works in HR. Nice girl. 

Giancarlo Stanton just sprained his wrist washing his hands

This is the rant of someone who’s never had to sacrifice anything or even think about anyone other than themself. Just grotesque.

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The federal government is classifying the deaths of patients infected with the coronavirus as COVID-19 deaths, regardless of any underlying health issues that could have contributed to the loss of someone’s life.

Dr. Deborah Birx, the response coordinator for the White House coronavirus task force, said the federal government is continuing to count the suspected COVID-19 deaths, despite other nations doing the opposite.


https://nypost.com/2020/04/07/feds-classify-all-coronavirus-patient-deaths-as-covid-19-deaths/?fbclid=IwAR2niDCGLbZbA2m5VramZmAHjC_kxkB5bx4AkU1MnNUNV2pfsc4eJiRV7Is

 

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Birx and Fauci reject Fox News-promoted theory that coronavirus deaths are inflated

Quote

The most recent CDC data shows that the number of pneumonia deaths are lower these past few weeks than they have been during a similar period in previous years. The numbers have been between 3,200 and 3,500 per week since the coronavirus arrived in the United States in January. (The most recent week shows 2,930, but with 84 percent of expected deaths reported, meaning that number should rise.) Generally in this period, the numbers are between 3,500 and 4,500.

But the CDC says these data are generally incomplete, even for months. A study of 2015′s data showed that “mortality data is approximately 27% complete within 2 weeks, 54% complete within 4 weeks, and at least 75% complete within 8 weeks of when the death occurred.”

And you look closely, you’ll notice the dates of this data. The last week for which we have any data is the week that ended March 21. Why is that March 21 date important? By that point, the United States had logged just 385 deaths from the coronavirus. There’s no way “thousands” of pneumonia deaths were being wrongly classified as deaths from the coronavirus because there weren’t even 1,000 coronavirus deaths logged, period.

[...]

Hume argued to Carlson that this bolsters his argument. He noted his doctor told him that people who have prostate cancer often have the condition when they die but actually die of something else.

“Particularly, there are lots of people who are asymptomatic, and they have other terrible diseases,” Hume said. “And if everybody is being automatically classified, if they’re found to have covid-19, as a covid-19 death, we’re going to get a very large number of deaths that way, and we’re probably not going to have an accurate count of what the real death total is.”

The problem with Hume’s prostate cancer comparison is that prostate cancer, unlike viruses, occurs over a long time. It’s logical that a large number of people who have prostate cancer will die with it rather than of it — because they will have a lot of time to contract other deadly ailments. With the coronavirus, the odds that any large number of people who have it are dying in the brief period in which they contract it, but in which the virus itself isn’t a cause, is highly illogical.

Much more logical is that they had conditions that were exacerbated by just such a respiratory disease, which is something health officials have been saying for months. If someone has had a lung ailment for years, for example, and suddenly dies within a week of getting the coronavirus, what are the odds that they would have died during that specific week without contracting the virus? Slim. There may be some such cases, but it’s not something that would account for any significant overcount — let alone the “thousands” Carlson cited.

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Backdoor Slider said:

 

The federal government is classifying the deaths of patients infected with the coronavirus as COVID-19 deaths, regardless of any underlying health issues that could have contributed to the loss of someone’s life.

Dr. Deborah Birx, the response coordinator for the White House coronavirus task force, said the federal government is continuing to count the suspected COVID-19 deaths, despite other nations doing the opposite.


https://nypost.com/2020/04/07/feds-classify-all-coronavirus-patient-deaths-as-covid-19-deaths/?fbclid=IwAR2niDCGLbZbA2m5VramZmAHjC_kxkB5bx4AkU1MnNUNV2pfsc4eJiRV7Is

 

 

Is there a reason why they are doing that differently than every other country.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, brockpapersizer said:

Is there a reason why they are doing that differently than every other country.

 

This is precisely how online misinformation spreads.  The quote was that *some* other countries count differently.  Not that everyone else does.

Here's a pretty layman-friendly discussion of the different ways to count deaths, and how none of them is inherently better or worse -- they're just measuring different things.

https://blog.ons.gov.uk/2020/03/31/counting-deaths-involving-the-coronavirus-covid-19/

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21 minutes ago, tonycpsu said:

 

This is precisely how online misinformation spreads.  The quote was that *some* other countries count differently.  Not that everyone else does.

Here's a pretty layman-friendly discussion of the different ways to count deaths, and how none of them is inherently better or worse -- they're just measuring different things.

https://blog.ons.gov.uk/2020/03/31/counting-deaths-involving-the-coronavirus-covid-19/

Would also like to say in the US the only deaths they count are those who have tested positive to covid and had not recovered prior to death, meaning it would have a hand in that death, even if by secondary infection. 

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52 minutes ago, MrBrown said:

This was a bit of good news https://www.wtsp.com/article/life/heartwarming/103-year-old-woman-beats-coronavirus/67-49f09fea-12c9-4ff6-8719-5d3a1c93b3c5

Not the first one but 103 year old Italian woman survives the coronavirus.

I guess it’s better than the story about a woman in my town who had to be placed in a ventilator and in a medically induced coma to give a forced c section at 34 weeks because of covid. Mom died. 

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43 minutes ago, daynlokki said:

I guess it’s better than the story about a woman in my town who had to be placed in a ventilator and in a medically induced coma to give a forced c section at 34 weeks because of covid. Mom died. 

Uh yea I'd say so.

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6 hours ago, jonninho said:

As a fellow human, i can acknowledge breaking habits are hard. However, i would also like to think that if they are educated prior to as why they may not be able to do that, or if they do, they must discard it properly that they would be capable of doing it while looking out for their teammates and their contracts to be honest. But, i have been let down by humanity plenty of times so breaking a habit that occurs so frequently and without much thought might be hard to accomplish.

People are ignoring stay at home orders which are pretty simple. What makes ball players any different? Those are habits that they have had for years. It's not only habits but rituals and 2nd nature for them. We are told not to touch our faces but we do it out of habit anyway. To me spitting will be the hardest habit to break and almost every ball player does it. Spewing droplets into the air is probably the worst thing they could do.

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423,985 active cases, 16,548 deaths, 25,156 recoveries, 9,959 serious condition currently in the US. Up to 2.35m tested now. 
1,757 deaths so far today. Critical cases have risen from 9,279 to 9,959 despite those deaths falling off of the critical cases from yesterday. 

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On 4/3/2020 at 11:17 PM, JE7HorseGod said:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sciencealert.com/why-herd-immunity-will-not-save-us-from-the-covid-19-pandemic

Re: one scientist's thoughts on herd immunity before a vaccine.

I really kinda think we have two options, and neither of them are super palatable.

Option number one, acknowledge the risk and let people outside as soon as we have an idea we won't be choking the health care system, knowing that a whole lot of people are going to get sick.

Option number two, continue to do what we are doing until a vaccine is developed and mass produced.

Honestly?  I don't see any way we can keep option 2 going for as long as they are saying they need to.  18 months with "shelter in place" orders?  Just ain't gonna happen.

 

On 4/3/2020 at 11:24 PM, Thenewwildone8 said:

Exactly! Can you imagine 18 months of this? How about 9 or even 4 or 5? 

Option one is just the more feasible of the two unappealing options.

So you two want Option 1 herd immunity? 
 

Sweden's Relaxed Approach to the Coronavirus Could Already Be Backfiring

1 hour ago, 2ndCitySox said:

 

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15 minutes ago, shakestreet said:

 

So you two want Option 1 herd immunity? 
 

Sweden's Relaxed Approach to the Coronavirus Could Already Be Backfiring

 

Did you read the article I posted there?

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3 minutes ago, shakestreet said:

Maybe . Well what is the best option 1 or 2

I don't believe number 2 is feasible of we're talking an 18 month timeline to develop and mass produce a vaccine.

I'm just a layperson and not a doc or a scientist.  The article I quoted though is from a doc who says herd immunity doesn't work without a vaccine.  I get that.  But I also don't believe we can or will shut the economy down for a year and a half.

I hope we've done enough to mitigate a lot of the damage, and can withstand additional waves with minimal strain on the healthcare system and as little loss of life as possible.  And that's really all I can do.

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15 minutes ago, JE7HorseGod said:

I don't believe number 2 is feasible of we're talking an 18 month timeline to develop and mass produce a vaccine.

I'm just a layperson and not a doc or a scientist.  The article I quoted though is from a doc who says herd immunity doesn't work without a vaccine.  I get that.  But I also don't believe we can or will shut the economy down for a year and a half.

I hope we've done enough to mitigate a lot of the damage, and can withstand additional waves with minimal strain on the healthcare system and as little loss of life as possible.  And that's really all I can do.

But the virus has been shown to mutate. Do we just take the losses as they come? Sooner or later there will be a critical mass of full hospital beds if we loosen up. Especially with several versions of the virus out there now. 

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46 minutes ago, daynlokki said:

But the virus has been shown to mutate. Do we just take the losses as they come? Sooner or later there will be a critical mass of full hospital beds if we loosen up. Especially with several versions of the virus out there now. 

Our economy can’t sustain constant quarantines that do nothing to actually cure the disease. Herd immunity actually does something to cure it. I recommend seeing what doctors are saying about the consequences of quarantines, they’re far worse as they lead to renewed waves of infections and a destroyed economy.

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2 minutes ago, Thenewwildone8 said:

Our economy can’t sustain constant quarantines that do nothing to actually cure the disease. Herd immunity actually does something to cure it. I recommend seeing what doctors are saying about the consequences of quarantines, they’re far worse as they lead to renewed waves of infections and a destroyed economy.

Got any specific recommendations?

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8 minutes ago, tucker26 said:

Got any specific recommendations?

https://www.sciencemediacentre.org/expert-comments-about-herd-immunity/
 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/reason.com/2020/03/18/coronavirus-quarantine-imperial-college-london-covid-19/%3famp


I think the solution is herd immunity plus quarantining those at risk.

 

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6 minutes ago, Thenewwildone8 said:


those are really long to read (tldr, lol). 
 

can you please point to the part that says “doctors are saying about the consequences of quarantines, they’re far worse as they lead to renewed waves of infections and a destroyed economy.”?

Edited by tucker26
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25 minutes ago, Thenewwildone8 said:

Our economy can’t sustain constant quarantines that do nothing to actually cure the disease. Herd immunity actually does something to cure it. I recommend seeing what doctors are saying about the consequences of quarantines, they’re far worse as they lead to renewed waves of infections and a destroyed economy.

How are you gonna have herd immunity with a virus that is mutating and reinfection again?

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3 minutes ago, tucker26 said:


those are really long to real (tldr, lol). 
 

can you point to the part that says “doctors are saying about the consequences of quarantines, they’re far worse as they lead to renewed waves of infections and a destroyed economy.”


Second, pandemics may have multiple waves until a sufficient number of individuals become immune,

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/thehill.com/opinion/healthcare/490028-anticipating-the-next-waves-of-covid-19%3famp

 

 

 

concerned that the social, economic and public health consequences of this near total meltdown of normal life—schools and businesses closed, gatherings banned—will be long lasting and calamitous, possibly graver than the direct toll of the virus itself. The stock market will bounce back in time, but many businesses never will. The unemployment, impoverishment and despair likely to result will be public health scourges of the first order.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/opinion/coronavirus-pandemic-social-distancing.html

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12 minutes ago, Thenewwildone8 said:

So exactly what Sweden is doing above that has lead to a death rate around 7%? Ya that’ll kill our economy even more than a shutdown with everyone receiving unemployment benefits. 

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