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Guess I'll start this thread. 

He dropped the A and has back-to-back multi-hit games (plus 2 dingers), which is completely unlike the man formerly known as Michael A. Taylor. 

He hit well in spring too. We'll see how long this lasts because they've been playing Rangers pitching, but he's always had a bit of upside. Maybe a change of scenery will do him well. Royals have a fun lineup.

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3 minutes ago, street sharks said:

Guess I'll start this thread. 

He dropped the A and has back-to-back multi-hit games (plus 2 dingers), which is completely unlike the man formerly known as Michael A. Taylor. 

He hit well in spring too. We'll see how long this lasts because they've been playing Rangers pitching, but he's always had a bit of upside. Maybe a change of scenery will do him well. Royals have a fun lineup.

Someone needs to Liquid-Slam merge all these interesting Royals outfielders into one super-player cause I don't have room to roster all of them. 

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better to be lucky than good.  I got him at pick 569 in my NFBC 15 teamer and am playing him due to the WAS vs NYM series cancellation.

 

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2 hours ago, Overlord said:

Someone needs to Liquid-Slam merge all these interesting Royals outfielders into one super-player cause I don't have room to roster all of them. 

Roster the Royals Catcher instead. 😜

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5 hours ago, street sharks said:

He dropped the A

Why?  What did the "A" do to him?  And how am I now going to separate him from the two dozen other Michael Taylors currently playing in the Majors.

(Glad he is out of Washington where he was always screwed for playing time earlier and now has no chance at time in the future).

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I picked him up in a 16 team league where we play LF/CF/RF.  While there isn't much out there on the WW, I read this article which convinced me to pick him up.  I got lucky and paying dividends now.  I'm not sure how much it is a factor but it does give some reason for optimism outside of just "luck"  and "terrible Rangers pitching" which are both true at the moment. 

 

https://royalsreporter.com/2020/12/01/will-michael-a-taylor-surprise-royals-fans-in-2021/

 

Skweres’ most fascinating point, which has also been touched upon in a Royals Review article by Craig Brown, is Taylor’s transition from utilizing a big leg kick to an approach that now refrains from using a kick at all. Essentially, Taylor went from an approach that was more akin to the power approach of Anthony Rendon, who did come up in the Nationals Minor League system with Taylor, to one that was simpler and more refined over the past couple of seasons.

While people should read the whole article, as Skweres utilizes analysis of GIFs in comparing Taylor and Rendon’s swings, here is a interesting tidbit that goes into more detail in regard to Taylor’s swing and approach transformation:

In 2018, Taylor had a big leg kick and a big separation movement with his hands.  The movement with his hands reminded me of his teammate at the time, Anthony Rendon.  However, Rendon did (does) it with a very simple stride while Taylor did it with the leg kick….The problem is that Taylor swung-and-missed too much in 2018 (30.1% K% and 32.1% Whiff %).  He also chased out of the zone 28.8% of the time, 5.5% worse than his current mark.  His approach over the offseason from ‘18 & ‘19? Clearly to simplify.

He not only eliminated the leg kick, but he totally eliminated his stride…

However, Taylor actually got worse in 2019.  As stated earlier in the breakdown, he struck out 35% of the time in 2019, whiffed more than he ever had, and pulled the ball more than he ever had.  

I think the struggles are mainly chalked up to a lengthy adjustment period.  As someone that’s gone through an adjustment period where I eliminated a leg kick in favor of a simple stride, it’s amazing how much more time you feel like you have, and it’s hard not to get out front and over the front side.

“Michael A. Taylor: A Buy Low Option” by Grayson Skweres

Skweres also goes into Taylor’s second season of his change, though like he mentioned before, there was an adjustment period, and he didn’t get a whole lot of at-bats to put his adjustments into action (he only played in 38 games in 2020):

So what did Taylor do in 2020? More of the same, mostly, with a tiny bit more simplification.

His front heel lift is less pronounced and more simple.  He has even less body movement, focusing on getting into hip coil.

There’s less movement with his hands, and he finishes his load with them in a lower position than he did in 2018 & 2019.  

He starts his load earlier in 2020 than he did in 2019.

“Michael A. Taylor: A Buy Low Option” by Grayson Skweres

As stated before, Skweres is not alone in this analysis as both Brown of Royals Review and Lewis of the Athletic also point this change out in their respective articles. And thus, Royals fans need to wonder: is Taylor on the verge of a breakout in 2021 offensively? After all, he has had less than 200 plate appearances with this new “approach”. If he gets anywhere from 400-500 plate appearances in 2021, could his new “swing” produce some tangible results as a Royal, with perhaps something close to his .271/.320/.486 line in 2017? (In which he accumulated 432 plate appearances in 118 games.)

The advanced metrics seem to hint that Taylor is progressing offensively, as his K rate dropped from 35.1 percent in 2019 to 27.3 percent in 2020, and inversely, his barrel rate increased from 7.1 percent to 13.8 percent from 2019 to 2020, respectively. And thus, while Taylor may not be a .300 hitter or make Royals fans forget Lorenzo Cain or his offensive and defensive production anytime soon, there are plenty of signs that his new plate approach and swing could finally come to fruition in Kansas City, which would make his $1.75 million more than worth it for the Royals.

 

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7 hours ago, Sternes said:

I picked him up in a 16 team league where we play LF/CF/RF.  While there isn't much out there on the WW, I read this article which convinced me to pick him up.  I got lucky and paying dividends now.  I'm not sure how much it is a factor but it does give some reason for optimism outside of just "luck"  and "terrible Rangers pitching" which are both true at the moment. 

 

https://royalsreporter.com/2020/12/01/will-michael-a-taylor-surprise-royals-fans-in-2021/

 

Skweres’ most fascinating point, which has also been touched upon in a Royals Review article by Craig Brown, is Taylor’s transition from utilizing a big leg kick to an approach that now refrains from using a kick at all. Essentially, Taylor went from an approach that was more akin to the power approach of Anthony Rendon, who did come up in the Nationals Minor League system with Taylor, to one that was simpler and more refined over the past couple of seasons.

While people should read the whole article, as Skweres utilizes analysis of GIFs in comparing Taylor and Rendon’s swings, here is a interesting tidbit that goes into more detail in regard to Taylor’s swing and approach transformation:

In 2018, Taylor had a big leg kick and a big separation movement with his hands.  The movement with his hands reminded me of his teammate at the time, Anthony Rendon.  However, Rendon did (does) it with a very simple stride while Taylor did it with the leg kick….The problem is that Taylor swung-and-missed too much in 2018 (30.1% K% and 32.1% Whiff %).  He also chased out of the zone 28.8% of the time, 5.5% worse than his current mark.  His approach over the offseason from ‘18 & ‘19? Clearly to simplify.

He not only eliminated the leg kick, but he totally eliminated his stride…

However, Taylor actually got worse in 2019.  As stated earlier in the breakdown, he struck out 35% of the time in 2019, whiffed more than he ever had, and pulled the ball more than he ever had.  

I think the struggles are mainly chalked up to a lengthy adjustment period.  As someone that’s gone through an adjustment period where I eliminated a leg kick in favor of a simple stride, it’s amazing how much more time you feel like you have, and it’s hard not to get out front and over the front side.

“Michael A. Taylor: A Buy Low Option” by Grayson Skweres

Skweres also goes into Taylor’s second season of his change, though like he mentioned before, there was an adjustment period, and he didn’t get a whole lot of at-bats to put his adjustments into action (he only played in 38 games in 2020):

So what did Taylor do in 2020? More of the same, mostly, with a tiny bit more simplification.

His front heel lift is less pronounced and more simple.  He has even less body movement, focusing on getting into hip coil.

There’s less movement with his hands, and he finishes his load with them in a lower position than he did in 2018 & 2019.  

He starts his load earlier in 2020 than he did in 2019.

“Michael A. Taylor: A Buy Low Option” by Grayson Skweres

As stated before, Skweres is not alone in this analysis as both Brown of Royals Review and Lewis of the Athletic also point this change out in their respective articles. And thus, Royals fans need to wonder: is Taylor on the verge of a breakout in 2021 offensively? After all, he has had less than 200 plate appearances with this new “approach”. If he gets anywhere from 400-500 plate appearances in 2021, could his new “swing” produce some tangible results as a Royal, with perhaps something close to his .271/.320/.486 line in 2017? (In which he accumulated 432 plate appearances in 118 games.)

The advanced metrics seem to hint that Taylor is progressing offensively, as his K rate dropped from 35.1 percent in 2019 to 27.3 percent in 2020, and inversely, his barrel rate increased from 7.1 percent to 13.8 percent from 2019 to 2020, respectively. And thus, while Taylor may not be a .300 hitter or make Royals fans forget Lorenzo Cain or his offensive and defensive production anytime soon, there are plenty of signs that his new plate approach and swing could finally come to fruition in Kansas City, which would make his $1.75 million more than worth it for the Royals.

 

Scott White talked about this too. Got my interest in him, being a speed threat if his bat is improved.

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