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1 hour ago, DerrickHenrysCleats said:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.si.com/.amp/nfl/2021/04/22/gameplan-steve-sarkisian-mac-jones-alabama-nfl-special

 

He’s already a pro,” Sarkisian said. “Prepares like an NFL quarterback, he’s been doing it. Understanding a game plan, which is very intricate in the National Football League, that will never be an issue with this guy. I mean, he’s going to put in the work, he’s going to prepare. He’s going to think like the coordinator and then ultimately he’s going to go execute the calls and the checks—he did it exactly like I would want him to.”

And that’s the part that Sarkisian knows will translate.

“How he gets to that point, I don’t know,” Sarkisian said. “Is he up till three in the morning memorizing, studying? That’s not really my concern. My concern is the next day when he comes in or on Saturdays when the ball’s kicked off. He knows exactly what the game plan is, why we’re doing what we’re doing, the checks that are needed, the issues on every play. If they do this, this could be a problem. The guy, he knew it. 

“And it was very comforting for me, calling plays, knowing I had a guy that was thinking like me on the field that I could have real dialogue with on the sidelines on why we were going to go do what we were going to do next based off of what we were getting. And he understood why. And it was easy for him because he had prepared so well.”

The NFL won’t be as easy, of course.

But as Sarkisian sees it, because of all of this, it’ll be a lot easier for Jones than some others. Which, if you don’t know him, might be just a little harder to see.

 

OCs pump up their own guys during the pre-draft process.  It's what they do.  What's Sarkasian going to say?  "We were 10x better than every team we played, and Mac Jones managed to keep from fouling it up."

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Mac is Cam backwards  💀

No he doesn't, and you don't think so either. Mac is fine and accurate when he has his first read and 4 seconds to read the field. He even gets to his second read occasionally. But he crumbles un

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7 hours ago, Boudewijn said:

Yeah yeah yeah. Never judge College guys on their highlights; judge them on how they react when they get in trouble, when they get hurried, when they get chased.

That highlight tape is nice for grandma but it's completely irrelevant when you get to the big boys; but the skills you learn and show under stress, those translate to the NFL - maybe. Can you make a decision with a DE in your face? Can you make a decision when all your receivers are covered? Can you change a play when the defense switches between man and zone?

You definitely don't see that in the highlight tapes, and quite often you don't see it in college at all. That's why people say "yes but he played at Alabama; not because that's somehow a negative, but because we do have to study harder to find the plays where he was under pressure.

For instance, in the Auburn game, most of his plays are from the pocket and he has all day to scan the field, and he does that well. The first time the pocket collapses, this happens:

giphy.gif

Is that necessarily bad? No, sometimes it's better to eat the sack than to play hero ball, especially up 0-7 in a game you're going to win anyway. But I think those plays are a whole lot more interesting than him throwing balls at open receivers for 6 minutes.

 


Mike Tyson famously once said that everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. That old adage really explains why, for the first 11 months he spent with Mac Jones, then Alabama offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian had his backup quarterback down as a smart, competitive kid with a lot left to prove.

Then, on Nov. 30, 2019, Jones really took one in the teeth.

That was the day of the Iron Bowl, and Jones’s third start for the Tide, in his third year on campus. Alabama’s archrival got after him. Auburn’s menacing front, juiced by No. 7 pick Derrick Brown, lived in the backfield that afternoon, registering eight tackles for losses. The chaos led to two pick-sixes by Jones—one a bad throw, the other bad luck—and as the sun set on Jordan-Hare Stadium, the crowd only got more hostile.

 

Both times, after the interceptions, he came right back, made some great throws and led us back down the field for a touchdown,” Sark said on Wednesday, from his new office in Austin. “Derrick Brown, they had some great pass rushers. I mean, he is standing in and taking hits and delivering strikes at critical moments and leads us down at the end of the game again for a game-tying field goal, which we ultimately missed. 

“But doing that—he earned a lot of respect for me. And I think he earned a lot of respect from his teammates, from the resiliency that he showed, the mental and physical toughness that he showed. And then we went on to beat Michigan in the bowl game. But that game always kind of stands out to me, not because we won, but more so of just him. I learned a lot about him in that game.”

 

this is a snippet from the article that I posted earlier. 
 

yes, good clip you showed of Mac Jones in his 3rd start ever against a top 10 defense he did get sacked, he even threw 2 pick sixes in the game but as Steve Sarkisian pointed out he stood strong in the pocket several times and delivered throws when he knew he was going to get blown up and led a game tying drive for a FG that the kicker ultimately missed.

 


highlight films are just that. They are highlights. They are posted so anyone can view what they are capable of, they are not intended to break down a players weaknesses.

 

Im sure I can find gifs of every QB taking a sack as the pocket collapses.

 

As to whether Mac will be able to audible at the line of scrimmage or understand what the defense is doing or understanding the weekly game plan and why it was implemented then there is this:

The next piece of the puzzle really surfaced at the outset of the pandemic. With Saban, Sarkisian and the rest of the staff unable to be around the players through parts of the spring and summer, it was on the guys in the locker room to take the bull by the horns to make the most of a year that most people within the program thought could end right where it did—with Alabama’s playing for a national title.

That Jones, even with just four starts, was charged with taking the lead on that isn’t unusual by any stretch of the imagination. He’s the quarterback, and the quarterback is often who that stuff falls on. But as for what happened when those guys got started? That’s when Sarkisian walked away thinking his quarterback was a little different.

“How organized things were. I said, well, ‘What’d you guys do?’ And he said, ‘This is what we covered. This is what we ran,’ ” Sarkisian said. “And I was like, Wow. Most guys go out and they throw some go-balls and some posts. And he’s running plays, they worked on audibles. I mean, he was working on all sorts of things because it was important to him. And then it became really important to them.”

 

Organizing the workouts] just came natural to him because he was so driven and so competitive,” Sarkisian continued. “But, yet, his teammates wanted to be there with him. That stood out to me, that this guy’s a really innate leader. And sometimes, again, that was hard to tell when Tua was in the building. All of the sudden, Tua wasn’t there anymore. He’s gone. He’s with the Dolphins. You really started to see the leadership qualities [from Jones].

“The players gravitate to him.”

And the work they were doing quickly showed up in Jones’s play. To prove it, Sarkisian scrolled back through his mental Rolodex to the Tide’s second game of 2020, and the offense’s first third down of that afternoon against Texas A&M, to best illustrate how quickly his confidence in Jones as more than a caretaker materialized.

Coming into the year, the coaches looked at their veteran offensive line—and bell cow Najee Harris behind it— factored in the losses of Tagovailoa, Henry Ruggs and Jerry Jeudy to the NFL, and figured they’d probably be able to break Jones in with a more conservative approach. The problem? Jones, because of the work he did, had the confidence and knowhow of a guy closer to his 60th start than his sixth.

“He didn’t blink,” Sarkisian said. “He cut it loose every time. … The first drive of the Texas A&M game early in the year, we had a third down and he had an alert to a big post to [John] Metchie that we probably hadn’t thrown in two years in practice and/or games. And the look presented itself versus A&M. And he didn’t blink. “

The call was actually to throw the ball underneath to Jaylen Waddle out of the slot, but a safety came down to double the Bama burner, and that left Metchie one-on-one way downfield. And if you go back and watch the play, you see there’s no hesitation.

He took the shot and we throw the big touchdown to Metchie on the first third down of the game, and that showed you his understanding of the offense, and yet his willingness to cut it loose when things presented themselves,” Sarkisian said. “That’s really how the year went the rest of the way.”

And as the wins piled up, the belief teammates had in Jones only grew. The main reason—as talented as Waddle, Metchie, Harris and Heisman winner DeVonta Smithwere—is that Jones was making them better, with his own understanding of what Sarkisian was trying to get done.

He wasn’t just helping those guys with what he wanted them to do. He was giving them the why, too, even with his start count still in single digits.

“He plays the tape forward a lot going into the game,” Sarkisian said. “And so when we put play calls in, he understands why we have the calls in the game plan. He’ll talk to the guys: Hey, we get man-to-man here; Smitty, expect this ball out of this look. Or, Hey, if it’s Cover 2 here, Waddle, be alert on this route. Or, Hey, Najee, if they blitz this backer now. I’m going to get this ball to you here quickly. So it was one thing to talk about it, and then it started to become a reality. In-game, when we got those looks, that’s where the ball would go. 

“So he gained a lot of trust from his teammates that it wasn’t just talking about it. It was the action following up on what he talked about with them.”

Which led to the final piece: As the season wore on and the stakes grew, Sarkisian gave Jones more and more rope to command the offense as he saw fit. And the perfect example came with the anniversary of Jones showing Sarkisian the stomach he had for the game in the Iron Bowl.
 

When this moment came, the game was in hand (Bama was up 35–6 in the fourth quarter), but it was significant in showing how far Jones and the offense around him had come.

“We had an alert on a play to change the protection to a max protection if they were going to all-out blitz us,” Sarkisian said. “And we saw the all-out blitz, and so we let them know to change the protection. So Mac changes the protection to the max protection. After that, then he changes the route combination and throws a touchdown on an inside fade to the slot receiver for a touchdown that …”

And Sarkisian then paused and laughed.

“If he hadn’t earned my trust, I might have been screaming from the sidelines, ‘No!’ ” he continued. “But as he went to change the play, it was like, Sit back, relax; this guy is in command and he’s going to a route combination that we have a lot of faith in. He believed it was going to work and he threw a touchdown pass on it.”

If you really look at the play, there’s one more thing there: His arm could cash the check that his mind was writing.

 

Sarkisian has pretty good perspective on what we’ve all been talking about, with regard to Jones, over the last month or so.

In 2017, Dan Quinn hired him to run Kyle Shanahan’s offense in Atlanta. The directive was clear from the Falcons at the time: They wanted their new play-caller to master and maintain the scheme that drove Atlanta in the Super Bowl the year before. And while he was there, over two seasons, Sarkisian coached Matt Ryan.

Bottom line, few would have a better feel for Jones’s fit in a place he’s been connected to since the Niners made the trade for the third pick four weeks ago, and even fewer would have any idea how valid all the comparisons Jones gets to Ryan are.

So on the Ryan comp, he says, “I do think it’s fair. They’re both good athletes in their own right, probably better than people give them credit for. They’re both very tough. I mean, Matt Ryan will stand in there and deliver the ball and take hits, and Mac does that. They both know what to do with the ball and throw it on time to the right people. And they both take their shots down the field and throw a catchable deep ball and give people chances.”

And on the Shanahan fit, he added, “He’d be a good fit. He has a really good understanding of the schemes and moving parts. I mean, clearly with Kyle, there’s a lot of motion. There’s a lot of intricate pieces to what he does. And he’d be a good fit understanding the whys in Kyle doing what he’s doing.”

 


This is a better breakdown from Sarkisian about the points that you mentioned and his mental toughness. 

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8 hours ago, SharkSwimmer said:

OCs pump up their own guys during the pre-draft process.  It's what they do.  What's Sarkasian going to say?  "We were 10x better than every team we played, and Mac Jones managed to keep from fouling it up."


if that’s true then all positive comments from any coach who has coached a player deserves the same scrutiny?

 

Mac needs positive reviews from guys who have never played with him or coached him?

 

😂

 

id imagine if Sark didn’t believe those things he could have just kept his mouth shut and focused on trying to make Texas into a winner again. 

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9 hours ago, Boudewijn said:

"... Never judge College guys on their highlights; judge them on how they react when they get in trouble, when they get hurried, when they get chased. ... For instance, in the Auburn game, most of his plays are from the pocket and he has all day to scan the field, and he does that well. The first time the pocket collapses, this happens: ..."

Love the clip you added (which there's a larger version of) and you're right, what our guy does when things go wrong can often paint a very different picture. Very interesting play, lots of stuff going on. Here the focus is on Jones but there's also the play itself & what the defense is in. So these first two numbered paragraphs focus on what's there for Jones in the narrow context of this specific play.

1.) Jones can & should make this throw: The z-slot flanker, where Jones is looking to throw, is there. This receiver is running a shallow cross & does have to sift thru a lot of traffic. Two defenders are covering him, but note that both are fronting the WR & that there's NOTHING behind it, apart from a lot of open field! Jones has a lane to step up into, which he does do. Now, one of them gets tripped up & ends up on the ground. The receiver also loses his footing a bit, so the likely outcome is an incomplete pass. A pocket passer at the next level has to make this throw! This is poorly defended, requiring a touch pass placed over those guys, only where his WR can get it.  

2.) That same passing lane can be exploited with his legs: We can debate whether Jones' clock rings soon enough, but it's moot. A better athlete hesitant to throw breaks contain & picks up the 1st down there, perhaps more! Again, there's a play for Jones to make, but he doesn't do it.  

3.) Play looks like a single read option: Points 3 & 4 go together, both are about the mental part of the game. After the flimsy run fake, Jones is staring down this one receiver. It doesn't appear as though he's reading the coverage but rather waiting for his one option to uncover. There are a lot of defenders in the short zone, there appears to be some combination of man/zone coverage. On the post snap the OL drop into pass-protect mode. The defenders read it & so the time Jones loses turning his eyes back to, is a net-negative. 

4.) Who commands the offense, not the QB: This play has a lot going for it. For those who may be interested, notice the home run ball that's there to take! Make note of the defensive alignment that should've been properly read on the pre-snap! And that the weak side slot rec'r runs a deep cross, a corner route, which is wide open!! The problem is that this WR never looks back for the ball, as if he's running a decoy route. So, on the pre-snap, in his verbage, the QB tells the slot he's now HOT! He could also ramp up the run action sell.

The counter might be that this is just one play, which is true. But if this is indicative of where Jones is at in his development, we could likely find things of concern on the plays that went right.       

 

Edited by markrc99
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17 minutes ago, markrc99 said:

Love the clip you added (which there's a larger version of) and you're right, what our guy does when things go wrong can often paint a very different picture. Very interesting play, lots of stuff going on. Here the focus is on Jones but there's also the play itself & what the defense is in. So these first two numbered paragraphs focus on what's there for Jones in the narrow context of this specific play.

1.) Jones can & should make this throw: The z-slot flanker, where Jones is looking to throw, is there. This receiver is running a shallow cross & does have to sift thru a lot of traffic. Two defenders are covering him, but note that both are fronting the WR & that there's NOTHING behind it, apart from a lot of open field! Jones has a lane to step up into, which he does do. Now, one of them gets tripped up & ends up on the ground. The receiver also loses his footing a bit, so the likely outcome is an incomplete pass. A pocket passer at the next level has to make this throw! This is poorly defended, requiring a touch pass placed over those guys, only where his WR can get it.  

2.) That same passing lane can be exploited with his legs: We can debate whether Jones' clock rings soon enough, but it's moot. A better athlete hesitant to throw breaks contain & picks up the 1st down there, perhaps more! Again, there's a play for Jones to make, but he doesn't do it.  

3.) Play looks like a single read option: Points 3 & 4 go together, both are about the mental part of the game. After the flimsy run fake, Jones is staring down this one receiver. It doesn't appear as though he's reading the coverage but rather waiting for his one option to uncover. There are a lot of defenders in the short zone, there appears to be some combination of man/zone coverage. On the post snap the OL drop into pass-protect mode. The defenders read it & so the time Jones loses turning his eyes back to, is a net-negative. 

4.) Who commands the offense, not the QB: This play has a lot going for it. For those who may be interested, notice the home run ball that's there to take! Make note of the defensive alignment that should've been properly read on the pre-snap! And that the weak side slot rec'r runs a deep cross, a corner route, which is wide open!! The problem is that this WR never looks back for the ball, as if he's running a decoy route. So, on the pre-snap, in his verbage, the QB tells the slot he's now HOT! He could also ramp up the run action sell.

The counter might be that this is just one play, which is true. But if this is indicative of where Jones is at in his development, we could likely find things of concern on the plays that went right.       

 

https://m.facebook.com/ESPNRadio941/videos/453175249270821/

 

BTW, solid analysis of a play from Mac Jones in his 3rd start in November of 2019, hopefully he has learned some things over the last 700+ days. 

Edited by DerrickHenrysCleats
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1 hour ago, DerrickHenrysCleats said:


if that’s true then all positive comments from any coach who has coached a player deserves the same scrutiny?

 

Mac needs positive reviews from guys who have never played with him or coached him?

 

😂

 

id imagine if Sark didn’t believe those things he could have just kept his mouth shut and focused on trying to make Texas into a winner again. 

The CFB coaches want their players to be drafted with early picks so it will make the coaches look good and increase their recruiting profile.

I can find similar talk, of similar value, down at my local used-car lot.

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12 hours ago, Deuce1042 said:

The conversation around Mac Jones is virtually indistinguishable from the conversations around Josh Rosen lol. 

??

maybe in that they're both being a little too hyped but I have heard zero concerns about Jones's work ethic, leadership, or love of the game

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15 hours ago, DerrickHenrysCleats said:


 

We Are All Witnesses.

 

*drools* all over the keyboard. I think one of the things with Mac is he gives you that nostalgia of the classic pocket passer. He throws a beautifully catchable ball. I don't think anyone could convince me that he wouldn't be the perfect fit for SF offense. He would be working with Aiyuk, Kittle, Deebo, one of the best rushing attacks in the NFL, top notch playcalling (similar passing concepts imo), an excellent OL and defense. The fit just makes too much sense. 

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1 minute ago, SharkSwimmer said:

The CFB coaches want their players to be drafted with early picks so it will make the coaches look good and increase their recruiting profile.

I can find similar talk, of similar value, down at my local used-car lot.


Ok, then scroll up and listen to what Kurt Warner had to say then.

 

In before @SharkSwimmercalls

Kurt Warner a grocery bagger.

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28 minutes ago, markrc99 said:

The counter might be that this is just one play, which is true. But if this is indicative of where Jones is at in his development, we could likely find things of concern on the plays that went right.     

Yeah, but I also want to clarify: I don't judge Mac on this one play, that would be silly.

And if you're watching a nice college game, it doesn't make much sense to focus on this. So he took one in the mouth, he's 22, he got up and fought on, give the kid a break. 

But I do think that for fantasy purposes, for my rookie draft, I think these clips are more interesting than the highlights alone. And I think DHC agrees.

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Mac Jones is in for a rude awakening in the NFL.

At Alabama, by the time he drops back and plants his back foot, his Passing Pocket is secure at 6+ Yards Deep and 6+ Yards Wide on both sides.

That NFL Passing Pocket will be cut in Half. When Mac Jones drops back to pass in the NFL and plants his back foot, that pocket will be 3 yards deep and 3 yards wide on both sides.

A lot harder to play QB when the walls of the pocket get compressed around you. Mac Jones won't know what to do with a small compressed pocket in the NFL - he's never experienced that at Alabama. It will rattle him, throw off his "accuracy", make him skittish in the pocket.

Playing QB on a level playing field in the NFL is not playing QB at Alabama. 

 

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2 hours ago, DerrickHenrysCleats said:


if that’s true then all positive comments from any coach who has coached a player deserves the same scrutiny?

 

 

 

Definitely.

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34 minutes ago, Boudewijn said:

Yeah, but I also want to clarify: I don't judge Mac on this one play, that would be silly.

And if you're watching a nice college game, it doesn't make much sense to focus on this. So he took one in the mouth, he's 22, he got up and fought on, give the kid a break. 

But I do think that for fantasy purposes, for my rookie draft, I think these clips are more interesting than the highlights alone. And I think DHC agrees.


of course.

 

that and listening to knowledgeable guys like Kurt Warner break down the good and bad aspects of prospect.

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32 minutes ago, PisEdiRin said:

Mac Jones is in for a rude awakening in the NFL.

At Alabama, by the time he drops back and plants his back foot, his Passing Pocket is secure at 6+ Yards Deep and 6+ Yards Wide on both sides.

That NFL Passing Pocket will be cut in Half. When Mac Jones drops back to pass in the NFL and plants his back foot, that pocket will be 3 yards deep and 3 yards wide on both sides.

A lot harder to play QB when the walls of the pocket get compressed around you. Mac Jones won't know what to do with a small compressed pocket in the NFL - he's never experienced that at Alabama. It will rattle him, throw off his "accuracy", make him skittish in the pocket.

Playing QB on a level playing field in the NFL is not playing QB at Alabama. 

 

Theoretically, all rookies are in for a rude awakening. Some adapt faster than others, some never adapt. We are betting that Mac has the makeup to adapt. Going from Alabama to SF would be as seamless a transition as possible.

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7 minutes ago, DerrickHenrysCleats said:

Chris Simms has Mac Jones as the 3rd best QB.

 


 

 

 

Chris Simms is trying to help out his buddy Kyle Shanahan by throwing up this smokescreen to fool the masses.

 

You've been fooled. Again.

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6 hours ago, PisEdiRin said:

Mac Jones is in for a rude awakening in the NFL.

At Alabama, by the time he drops back and plants his back foot, his Passing Pocket is secure at 6+ Yards Deep and 6+ Yards Wide on both sides.

That NFL Passing Pocket will be cut in Half. When Mac Jones drops back to pass in the NFL and plants his back foot, that pocket will be 3 yards deep and 3 yards wide on both sides.

A lot harder to play QB when the walls of the pocket get compressed around you. Mac Jones won't know what to do with a small compressed pocket in the NFL - he's never experienced that at Alabama. It will rattle him, throw off his "accuracy", make him skittish in the pocket.

Playing QB on a level playing field in the NFL is not playing QB at Alabama. 

 

Nice contradicting statement there. He's never done it, yet you're 100% certain he won't be able to? Fascinating. What evidence directed you to this conclusion?

Perhaps a young QB is still developing at 22. I'm not saying Mac Jones is going to be a star, but I find it humorous that you speak in such absolutes when you really don't know what you're talking about lol.

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25 minutes ago, ThreadKiller said:

Nice contradicting statement there. He's never done it, yet you're 100% certain he won't be able to? Fascinating. What evidence directed you to this conclusion?

Perhaps a young QB is still developing at 22. I'm not saying Mac Jones is going to be a star, but I find it humorous that you speak in such absolutes when you really don't know what you're talking about lol.

Mac Jones = Jared Goff

Have you watched Jared Goff under pressure? He goes bananas.

Mac Jones is a sitting duck in the pocket with a below-average NFL arm.

 

 

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8 hours ago, beotos said:

*drools* all over the keyboard. I think one of the things with Mac is he gives you that nostalgia of the classic pocket passer. He throws a beautifully catchable ball. I don't think anyone could convince me that he wouldn't be the perfect fit for SF offense. He would be working with Aiyuk, Kittle, Deebo, one of the best rushing attacks in the NFL, top notch playcalling (similar passing concepts imo), an excellent OL and defense. The fit just makes too much sense. 

 

The fit makes absolutely no sense. Mac Jones is a downgrade from Jimmy G. 

 

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